Shop
My account
Ingredients

Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6 has links to reducing the risk of cognitive decline, find out more here.
Sophie Medlin
Head of Nutritional Research
February 17, 2020
2 min read

Major Functions

Metabolism of nutrients - Synthesis of red blood cells and neurotransmitters - Mood regulation

In every dose

30mg (equal to 9oz tuna steak or 3 cups of chickpeas)

Fighting Talk

Vitamin B6 is key in metabolising homocysteine - which is important as elevated levels have been associated with higher risks of depression, psychiatric disorders, dementia and Alzheimer’s.

What’s in it for my brain?

Vitamin B6 is key in metabolising homocysteine - which is important as elevated levels have been associated with higher risks of depression, psychiatric disorders, dementia and Alzheimer’s.

Fringe benefits

Essential for energy release from food 

Essential for haemoglobin formation

Plays well with

Iron and B6 work together to form haemoglobin, so it’s important to consume both.

Clever stuff

Vitamin B6 may help to improve brain function and even prevent Alzheimer’s disease; one clinical trial found that vitamin supplementation with folic acid, B6 and B12 slowed shrinking of the brain over two years in areas of the brain that are associated with cognitive decline.


Evidence

Here’s a handful of relevant scientific studies on vitamin B6.

  • Hvas, A. M., Juul, S., Bech, P., & Nexø, E. (2004). Vitamin B6 level is associated with symptoms of depression. Psychotherapy and psychosomatics, 73(6), 340-343.
  • Folstein, M., Liu, T., Peter, I., Buel, J., Arsenault, L., Scott, T., & Qiu, W. W. (2007). The homocysteine hypothesis of depression. American Journal of Psychiatry, 164(6), 861-867.
  • Herrmann, W., Lorenzl, S., & Obeid, R. (2007). Review of the role of hyperhomocysteinemia and B-vitamin deficiency in neurological and psychiatric disorders--current evidence and preliminary recommendations. Fortschritte der Neurologie-psychiatrie, 75(9), 515-527.
  • Nutt, D. J. (2008). Relationship of neurotransmitters to the symptoms of major depressive disorder. The Journal of clinical psychiatry, 69, 4-7.
  • Clayton, P. T. (2006). B 6-responsive disorders: a model of vitamin dependency. Journal of inherited metabolic disease, 29(2-3), 317-326.
  • Douaud, G., Refsum, H., de Jager, C. A., Jacoby, R., Nichols, T. E., Smith, S. M., & Smith, A. D. (2013). Preventing Alzheimer’s disease-related gray matter atrophy by B-vitamin treatment. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 110(23), 9523-9528.

About Heights

  • Our Mission
  • Our Experts
  • Learn
  • Careers

The Sunday Supplement

Kickstart your week with the latest brain-performance tips from neuroscience & psychology, plus a tasty brain-food recipe.

By sharing your email address, you are agreeing to receive email marketing communications from Heights from time to time. We will not share your details with any 3rd parties. Please review our Privacy Policy for more information.

This product is not designed to replace a varied and balanced diet. Do not exceed stated dose. If you are pregnant, breastfeeding or taking any medication, please consult your doctor before use. Do not use it if the sachet has been opened. Store in a cool, dry place. Keep out of reach of children.